What's new

Which NC’s to Age?

Rating - 100%
14   0   0
Joined
Nov 27, 2012
Messages
480
Location
Washington State
That’s funny, I would almost completely agree with him. Tat broadleaf hits its peak around 2 years in most cases. The ‘17 TAA is amazing right now!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I cant speak for Tat broadleaf 'broadly'(lol) as I only have experience with Tatuaje Casita Criolla(which have gotten way better with age IMO)

But I was mostly talking about the Hererra Esteli and Illusione Epernay. I've found that fresh from the box, both are good. However they get way better with age!
I first found this, when i compared a epernay from around 2015 or so, to a box I had bought in 2016. The 2015 with the year of age was way better. A year later in 2016, my 1 year aged epernay were comparable I found. But, YMMV. The same experience has occured with the Hererra estelli, amongst other blends. IMO NC cigars tend to get more smooth a little more mild, and a lot more complex with age.
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Oct 7, 2019
Messages
10
I'm going to give a very controversial opinion but I'm going to say it anyway because in my experience it's true.

There are VERY few cigars in general that are worth the aging investment unless they are a big nic bomb or a harsh flavor. Chemical compounds break down with time and only very subtly change. How much you can perceive it is also very subjective. I have intentionally (and unintentionally. lol) aged many cigars well over the 5+ year mark, great yello on the cello and all, but most of the time I find myself regretting not smoking it years earlier.
I stopped intentionally trying to age cigars years ago because it is a waste of space. NC are generally ready to smoke when shipped to consumers (obv some incubation time required; 2-4 weeks is good enough - I do 4 weeks).

The only exception I would say to aging is Cuban cigars because, frankly, they ship with tobacco that is way too young and needs more time to develop.
 
Rating - 100%
14   0   0
Joined
Nov 27, 2012
Messages
480
Location
Washington State
I'm going to give a very controversial opinion but I'm going to say it anyway because in my experience it's true.

There are VERY few cigars in general that are worth the aging investment unless they are a big nic bomb or a harsh flavor. Chemical compounds break down with time and only very subtly change. How much you can perceive it is also very subjective. I have intentionally (and unintentionally. lol) aged many cigars well over the 5+ year mark, great yello on the cello and all, but most of the time I find myself regretting not smoking it years earlier.
I stopped intentionally trying to age cigars years ago because it is a waste of space. NC are generally ready to smoke when shipped to consumers (obv some incubation time required; 2-4 weeks is good enough - I do 4 weeks).

The only exception I would say to aging is Cuban cigars because, frankly, they ship with tobacco that is way too young and needs more time to develop.
Id say your not really saying anything controversial, but instead saying exactly what the majority of people already always say. lol.
 

Hoshneer

Blumpkin King
DONOR
Rating - 100%
94   0   0
Joined
Nov 16, 2011
Messages
7,481
Location
Fort Wayne, IN
This is a hard question and the answer is whatever you prefer aged. We all have completely different palates. My favorite aged cigars are Liga, JDN Antano 1970 and some of AJ's stuff mellows out great. Cubans for me I actually like either way but I do love some aged ones as well.

It's trial and error though and you will find it's unique for everyone just like pairing.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

icehog3

Outlaw Hockey Biker
DONOR
Rating - 100%
53   0   0
Joined
Sep 6, 2005
Messages
14,610
Location
Chicagoland
Lol did you see that the Buenaventura made it into the Cigar Aficionado ratings from the latest issue? They didn't even include the brand. Just flat out called it Buenaventura. Even CA KNOWS that you don't talk about Curivari.
Why don’t you talk about Curivari?
He could tell you, Chayse, but then he'd have to kill you.
 

Boudie

DONOR
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Joined
Jan 30, 2017
Messages
3,222
Did you know?

Curivari and Gurka are both indigenous people of Nepal. The Gurka tribe is well know for their incredible fighting skills, especially their ability to wield the namesake knife. The Curivari on the other hand where defeated by Italy in both the late 19th century and the early 20th century in a prelude to the tensions that lead to the start of World War !.

The point being that smoking Gurkas make you brave and fearless while smoking Curivari means you can relate to a people beaten twice by a county that shares it's name with a salad dressing.
 
Rating - 100%
60   0   0
Joined
Feb 4, 2015
Messages
2,675
Did you know?

Curivari and Gurka are both indigenous people of Nepal. The Gurka tribe is well know for their incredible fighting skills, especially their ability to wield the namesake knife. The Curivari on the other hand where defeated by Italy in both the late 19th century and the early 20th century in a prelude to the tensions that lead to the start of World War !.

The point being that smoking Gurkas make you brave and fearless while smoking Curivari means you can relate to a people beaten twice by a county that shares it's name with a salad dressing.
This knowledge has changed my life
 
Rating - 100%
11   0   0
Joined
Jun 11, 2015
Messages
1,427
Seeking wisdom from experienced smokers....

I smoked a Olivia V Melanio Torpedo several weeks back that I really enjoyed, so I Immediately got a 10 pack of Robustos from a big online retailer. I smoked one after resting for two weeks and it was nowhere as good, almost boring and bland. I am not sure what is the problem but figured it could be due to the age, as the one I smoked oriiginally was several years old (a gift). I read that most NCs don’t need aging as most manufacturers take care of that already? But I also often read about how people enjoy certain blends much more after several years of aging. So that leads me to wonder....

What are some NCs worth aging? What are some NCs that should avoid aging? I get it’s all personal taste, but want to hear some opinions out there.
It could've been what you paired your smoke up with on those occasions also. Did you have the same beverage with the V both times?
A couple years ago I stumbled upon the best blend ever(personal preference of course) as I sipped my Four Rose's Small Batch on ice. The next day I had the same cigar blend, same age, on the way to work with an ice tea. What a let down that was!
That is how I learned about pairing cigars and drinks. Maybe you have stumbled upon something similar?
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Joined
Jan 25, 2017
Messages
289
Smoke em if you have em, right?

I have wondered about the aging topic, and naturally I’ve bought more than I can reasonably smoke that fast.

I’ve tried different things, and find that I enjoy each smoke a little different. I keep learning.

I’m pretty content, though, with an airtight plastic container with the right humidity and temps (my basement) than spending a high dollar on fancy equipment.

But, sticks that I still enjoy with 2 + years on them are Jericho Hill, Casa Cuba, Four Kicks, Alec Bradley Prensado, Aging Room F55, flor de las Antillas, padron thousand, my father, las mareas, nub Cameroon 358 & 460, rosalila, Jamie Garcia, various punch, Cohiba Nicaragua, Crux guild, various tatuaje and several surrogates. Working on some Roma crafts - but don’t think they’ll make it that long.

Such a subjective topic. It’s eerily similar to the handgun caliber debate.

Smoke what you like when you want. Everyone will have opinion on it. For example, there are very few CC that I would prefer over a good Nicaraguan. But... then there is the Casa Cuba - which I really am a fan of with a nice glass of Basil Hayden.
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Joined
Mar 17, 2014
Messages
277
I like to age limited edition "newer" stuff along with anything I smoke rott and do not like. I have aged some 20 years and should have smoked them 10 years earlier, all a guess.
If I find something I really enjoy in a humidor, best to smoke them all fast and then find my next "favorite".
For example, I have several boxes of Benji's and they primed, in my opinion, about two years ago. I have some left to smoke, not as good as they were before. Big game when you buy alot
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
May 13, 2019
Messages
8
Aging rant, sorry. You guys don't know me, but I'm a FOG. Sorta. :) I've been aging cigars for decades just to figure out what is best, what I like, etc... They make chocolate and vanilla for a reason, so much of this is personal preference. Ymmv and all has been probably said before, bit I have the day off. :)

I've smoked damned near everything. Likely 25,000+ cigars. Don't think about the number too much, it hurts. :)

Part of that preference come from paying attention to aging cigars and have led me to these random thoughts on aging both Cuban and non Cuban cigars (it doesn't really matter, the effects are the same).

- Connecticut shade and Cameroon deteriorate in flavor and elasticity quickly. If you're like me, CT shade only has grassy flavor to lose unless you're a kelner disciple and can use it correctly. Otherwise, I'm no help and it should never be used. ;)

- All cigars benefit from a year or so of aging. No doubt. You may like the taste better right off the table, but the guy blending it probably put it to market before he wanted to. Gotta make a living right? Can't blame em. At this point when I buy a box of cigars, I'm not gonna likely open it for a year. Again, decades of doing this so yes, 1000s of cigars so no rush.

- All cigars reach the end of their aging benefit. It's a natural product. I've smoked my fair share of pre embargos, unique one offs and my own failures to know I missed the sweet spot for a particular cigar (they might be fantastic but maybe not it's peak if we're being honest?). Happens all the time (too many cigars, ODO is a different and real problem. lol).

- if you have the time and inclination, SHAT is the best way to age cigars. Two layers of cedar, no ventilation. No higher than 65 rh. Cold is your friend. I wouldnt hesitate to keep a box of cigars at 50/60 for a decade. Little dry, but it won't degrade as fast as 70/70 which is HORRIBLE for long term aging. Yeah, go argue plume/mold somewhere else. It's either crystallized oil (indifferent to quality at best if it's crystallized), minerals from your bad water (objectively bad) or mold. Think of the classic Cuban dress box or SLB. Nothing more is needed. Even if you have plume on a cigar (even!) it does nothing more than tell you it's old. It doesn't impart flavor because an oxidized oil. Quite the opposite! little C4H10s are flying off day by day creating fewer flavors (the chemical bits that we like) It is fun and Connecticut broadleaf does it better than any I've seen. Little chewy crystally goodies! But aging objectively REDUCES the flavor/aroma compounds in a cigar. You want the high VOCs like ammonia gone, but not the hydrocarbons. :)

- cello. Doesn't matter unless you're geeking out and want to. I don't undress my cigars or wrap them in cedar (I do have a stupid habit of bagging the last five cigars from a box and tossing them in cedar and in a Tupperware containers to age five packs. Thats a holdover from the early 90s and stuck.) - crappy cello turns yellow regardless. I have 20 year old cigars in shiny clear cello and yellow cello.

- length to age depends on the cigar and it's totes obv as you'd expect. Stronger, fuller, more complex tobacco will age gracefully. Broadleaf, old Cuban corojo, etc, and delicate tobacco doesn't. I've never opened a box of cigars after a decade and thought it was objectively better than at it's sweet spot and every cigar (imo) will hit it's sweet spot before year 10. (5-7 for me, but I smoke mostly fuller bodied cigars). I do like nic bombs on occasion, but thats not a guarantee of something aging well. I read above where someone said two years. I bet if you let it ride a year or two longer you won't see a drop off. I don't even consider a cigar "aged" unless it's five years old. Before that, it's just a cigar. :)

- quality, quality, quality. Crappy tobacco isn't handled correctly and doesn't age well. Most of the shit we buy is excellent quality so I wouldn't worry about it. It isn't the 90s and sites like this won't steer you too far wrong other than pushing fuentes, but the cult following isn't unique to here.

- blend. If you aren't aware or don't know who blended the cigar you're aging, don't sweat it. But it matters. Blending and talented blenders are the reason we have the Renaissance of cigar selection right now. It's never been better. Quality and options are higher across the board imo than ever before.

But don't be throwing down mass produced mediocre product and think it's gonna shine up. The general made punch diablos are still garbage and will be after five more years. Just less objectionable garbage (they're my vote for worst release of 2019, aging room pura cepa rondo or 2019 DE esteli lancero #1 on my list). Non one off, reg production.

I still act like I did when I first started smoking and aging cigars... I buy at a rate that outpaces my smoking and when I get to the end of a box, I'll pull off a five pack and see what another five years does if I'm inclined. Still learning. I was moving things around the other day and came across a couple of five packs of BRC and PSD4 so that's always fun. I'll probably sample them vertically with current releases for comp.

Smoking a fresh DE nica rustica brujito (2 years) right now... These do age nicely tho - very few get there however as these are like crack to me. :)
 
Top