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Any Other Woodworkers on BOTL?

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I actually just started getting back into wood working since I've been off work for the past month or so. I'm finding it very therapeutic to work with my hands and create things that people and my family all enjoy. I've also found it as a way to bond with my teenage daughter. Throughout the years we have grown more and more distant but one day a few weeks ago while I was in the garage working she came put and just watched. Eventually she asked if I could teach her to build stuff. I said sure why not. We ended up making some end tables and a sofa table together. Now shes hooked and wants to try and build a coffee table with me! I'm so excited

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PetersCreek

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The day will soon be upon us and that day is Thursday: the contractor will be here to replace our boiler, water heater, and garage heater. Fortunately, it's not an emergency job. Everything is just old and tired, being original to the house built in 1984, and we've been talking about upgrading for years. The platform they sit on is old and tired, too and it's my job to build a new one. The new platform is shorter, left-to-right, since the new boiler is narrower than the old unit and we're replacing two 40-gallon gas-fired water heaters with a single indirect model. It's deeper, front-to-back, because the new boiler requires more clearance from the wall in order to meet code.

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I finished buying materials Saturday, got it all cut to size, and counterbored/pre-drilled the fastener holes. On Sunday, I assembled the substructure upside-down on a pair of saw horses using lag screws and construction adhesive, then gave it a quick wipedown with boiled linseed oil. I flipped it onto its legs, glued and screwed the decking in place, and laid some vinyl composite tile on top of that. All that remains is to flush trim the tile, install some trim to conceal and protect the plywood/tile edges, and apply a coat of water-repellant finish. Being of 2x6 and 4x4 construction with 10 crossmembers, this thing is an over-engineered, six-legged beast. I know because my aching back tells me it's so.

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I'm curious about how you all handle staining wood and keeping it elevated to allow even drying. I've fashioned some scraps to hold pieces on edge, minimizing the contact area while allowing a piece to be supported.
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Simply cut a notch in some scrap plywood to hold the scrap strip such that a corner is up.
I actually have 3 notches, some close some spread out, depending on what will be supported.
20200305_181417.jpg

What do you all do?
 

unfairtoast

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I'm curious about how you all handle staining wood and keeping it elevated to allow even drying. I've fashioned some scraps to hold pieces on edge, minimizing the contact area while allowing a piece to be supported.
View attachment 146500
Simply cut a notch in some scrap plywood to hold the scrap strip such that a corner is up.
I actually have 3 notches, some close some spread out, depending on what will be supported.
View attachment 146501

What do you all do?
This is smart. Much smarter than what I end up doing.
It usually ends up like this:
1. Tidy up the garage and clear my workbenches of all my wife's things.
2. Try to find the paintbrush that *I* always put back into the same spot but the wife can't find after she uses them.
3. Root around the garage trying desperately to find things to prop up my project.
4. Start the project but realize that I need probably double drying area than I thought.
5. Root around again and find different options.
6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 as necessary.

Toss in a couple cigars, some beverages, and a German shepherd that sets her frisbee either on my feet or near enough to trip me up occasionally and that 20 min project easily stretches into a 5 or 6 hour project.
 

PetersCreek

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The convenient thing about our loveseat, is that it has a couple of drink holders built in. The inconvenient thing about our loveseat is the built-in drink holders don't fit coffee mugs with handles, large wine glasses, and they don't have room for cheese plates, chip bowls, or the cat. Sofa tables are pretty common but we wanted something different and more useable. This is what I came up with:

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This will coordinate with the magazine caddies I made a while back so this will be made of quarter-sawn white oak as well. The tabletop will consist of bookmatch, shop-made veneer over an MDF blank and will be edge-banded with a bent lamination that also acts as a lip. Two tapered plugs under the top will snugly sit in the drink holders while two curved, tapered leg provide support up front.

The first order of business was to make a pattern and forms. I glued up a 1½-inch thick blank from two pieces of ¾-inch plywood and made a pattern for the tabletop from a scrap of ½-inch plywood. After cleaning up and rough cutting the plywood blank into appropriately sized pieces, I used the pattern to make a clamping form for the laminated edge banding. In turn, I used the form as a pattern to make a clamping caul. I notched the caul for clamping and lined it it with PSA cork, then drilled some holes in the form for clamping.


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The oak I selected for the table top had a pretty gnarly looking stub of a branch in it, so I hoped there was something interesting going on inside. But I rough cut the workpiece extra long in case I need to work around it. When I split it to reveal the bookmatch, I was rewarded with some nice crotch figure and a few cracks and voids. I glued the pieces into a panel and filled the open spaces with used coffee grounds and CA (super) glue.

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Over the past couple of evenings, I split the panel again, planed them, and rough cut them for the top and bottom veneers. It's in the clamps as I type this.
 

PetersCreek

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What with errands and shop chores this weekend, I didn't make a lot of progress on the project. The veneered tabletop blank came out of the clamps, of course and I got it squared up, then planed the veneers down to about 1/32". I wasn't happy the symmetry in the cracks...one side was much more pronounced than the other...so I used a couple of carving gouges to add some cracks of my own and filled them as before.

I also broke down some more stock for making lamination strips and while I was at it, I roughed out the legs. I printed a full size pattern of the leg profile, affixed it to the stock, and cut it out at the bandsaw. I still had the big resaw blade on, so I couldn't cut the tightest curve. I'll get to that later. This piece is 2 inches thick and will get split down the middle to make two legs, once the profile is finished.

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I'm super excited. I finally got my hands on a 14" Delta Band Saw. According to the serial number, this one was manufactured in 1948. She runs like a champ. Needs a little cleaning, and I plan on adding a riser block and making a few upgrades, but I am very happy. I've been wanting to get a vintage 14" Delta for a while now.

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I hope we get through this COVID struggle soon. I'm replacing my dust mask as the one I've been using is about done. Wish I could buy another box of them but the store shelves still don't have these...
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