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PetersCreek

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I started a new picture frame this weekend. This one is similar to the last but smaller, in cherry, with walnut inlay and miter splines. I milled the pieces on Saturday and glued them up.

I started today off by making a thickness planing jig to make the inlay strips. I don’t trust my surface planer with really thin, narrow strips because sometimes lifts the leading edge, causing them to pretty much explode. I’m not sure it’s original with him but I got the idea from Rob Cosman. Painters tape fine tuned the thickness.



I ripped the strips to rough thickness on the table saw and planed them down using a low angle block plane. I then fit them to the grooves using another quick and dirty jig. I don’t remember the name for it but it’s based on a jig I saw in an older magazine or book. It allowed me to tweak the fit of the tiny miters for a tight fit. The square end also worked as a guide for trimming them to rough length with a small pull saw.




After the glue set up a bit, I cut the corner spline slots using the jig I made for the previous frame. Since these weren’t to be cut as deeply as on the larger frame, I applied some vinyl tape to control tear out on the back side of the cut.




I used my surface planer to mill the corner splines since they’re from wider stock. I did so using an auxiliary bed made from waxed MDF, so I wasn’t working near the planer’s depth limit. The spline stock was then cut to rough size and glued in the slots.



After the glue had cured enough for moderate working, I flushed up the splines and inlay.



Now it’s down to sanding, the rabbet, and finish.
 

kit_luce

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Today, I finished a quick (for me) and simple project: a picture frame.



The Wife and I bought these prints from a local artist during our day trip to Talkeetna last summer. I had the mat and glass cut to my specifications then made the frame to fit. The primary wood is sapele, with maple miter splines. The finish was boiled linseed oil, Sealcoat, and satin spray lacquer.

Unfortunately, the lighting doesn’t do the sapele justice. The grain shimmers when your viewing angle changes, with light bands turning darker and vice versa.
I started a new picture frame this weekend. This one is similar to the last but smaller, in cherry, with walnut inlay and miter splines. I milled the pieces on Saturday and glued them up.

I started today off by making a thickness planing jig to make the inlay strips. I don’t trust my surface planer with really thin, narrow strips because sometimes lifts the leading edge, causing them to pretty much explode. I’m not sure it’s original with him but I got the idea from Rob Cosman. Painters tape fine tuned the thickness.



I ripped the strips to rough thickness on the table saw and planed them down using a low angle block plane. I then fit them to the grooves using another quick and dirty jig. I don’t remember the name for it but it’s based on a jig I saw in an older magazine or book. It allowed me to tweak the fit of the tiny miters for a tight fit. The square end also worked as a guide for trimming them to rough length with a small pull saw.




After the glue set up a bit, I cut the corner spline slots using the jig I made for the previous frame. Since these weren’t to be cut as deeply as on the larger frame, I applied some vinyl tape to control tear out on the back side of the cut.




I used my surface planer to mill the corner splines since they’re from wider stock. I did so using an auxiliary bed made from waxed MDF, so I wasn’t working near the planer’s depth limit. The spline stock was then cut to rough size and glued in the slots.



After the glue had cured enough for moderate working, I flushed up the splines and inlay.



Now it’s down to sanding, the rabbet, and finish.
I aspire to one day be half as good as you in the woodshop
 

bwhite220

Brandon | BotM Jan 2038
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First of all, hot damn! This is freaking sexy!!

Secondly, can you tell me more about these 2 jigs?

I started today off by making a thickness planing jig to make the inlay strips. I don’t trust my surface planer with really thin, narrow strips because sometimes lifts the leading edge, causing them to pretty much explode. I’m not sure it’s original with him but I got the idea from Rob Cosman. Painters tape fine tuned the thickness.
I have the exact same block plane and have the exact same issues with my thickness planer. For this jig, what is supporting the strip that you planing down? It looks like there is nothing below it in the picture. Also, how does the tape work? I would think once the blade hits the tape, it'll just cut through it like it does the wood, and in turn, defeats the purpose. I know I'm missing something here! :)



I don’t remember the name for it but it’s based on a jig I saw in an older magazine or book. It allowed me to tweak the fit of the tiny miters for a tight fit.

Is this like an inverted shooting jig? In other words, are you running the block plane against the 45 degree fence to get a perfect 45 degree mitre on the inlay strip? Or, am I again missing something on this one.


I'm completely fascinated by everything you do, Brett! haha
 
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First of all, hot damn! This is freaking sexy!!

Secondly, can you tell me more about these 2 jigs?



I have the exact same block plane and have the exact same issues with my thickness planer. For this jig, what is supporting the strip that you planing down? It looks like there is nothing below it in the picture. Also, how does the tape work? I would think once the blade hits the tape, it'll just cut through it like it does the wood, and in turn, defeats the purpose. I know I'm missing something here! :)





Is this like an inverted shooting jig? In other words, are you running the block plane against the 45 degree fence to get a perfect 45 degree mitre on the inlay strip? Or, am I again missing something on this one.


I'm completely fascinated by everything you do, Brett! haha
These are good questions, and I too would like to know more. Looking to learn from a master, if you will.
 

PetersCreek

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I have the exact same block plane and have the exact same issues with my thickness planer. For this jig, what is supporting the strip that you planing down? It looks like there is nothing below it in the picture. Also, how does the tape work? I would think once the blade hits the tape, it'll just cut through it like it does the wood, and in turn, defeats the purpose. I know I'm missing something here! :)
Yeah, the pic isn’t exactly self explanatory. Try this:



The plane rides on top of the lower runners which are spaced just wider than the plane blade. The upper runners keep it tracking straight over the lower runners. The depth of the bed, minus a titch for the protruding blade, determines the maximum thickness of the strip...in this case a little less than the 1/4-inch thickness of the lower runners. I put in a thin spacer plus several layers of painters tape to allow for a planed thickness of a little less than 1/8-inch. What you see is the strip laying on top of the tape that’s about as wide as the bed. So the plane never reaches the tape.

Is this like an inverted shooting jig? In other words, are you running the block plane against the 45 degree fence to get a perfect 45 degree mitre on the inlay strip? Or, am I again missing something on this one.
Yep, the angled face is the reference surface for the plane sole. It’s a quick and dirty riff on the old miter jack, a jig you don’t see much of these days. I made the rabbet with a couple of cuts on the table saw, over cut a little to leave a small slot into which the strip fit. Position the strip a little proud of the angled face, and plane it down until it’s flush. Easy to make very small adjustments to the length of the strip.
 
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Starting off simple. Since I just put this top heavy drill press in the shop, and have an enthusiastic 11 year old son, I bolted in broader feet for stability.
20190309_232509.jpg
Front to back seemed stable as built, side ways was more easily wobbled.
It gave me the opportunity to try out the new machine too!
20190309_230225.jpg
 

PetersCreek

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Good work, Jim. I still need a full size drill press.

I whipped up a quick project today, start-to-finish. We have a ceramic salt box in our kitchen and the wooden lid was looking quite sad. It was pine, with a reeded texture that efficiently collected cooking grime. So I decided to replace it.

I selected a scrap of wenge that was already milled to a thickness slightly more than the original but still proportional to the box. A few cuts on the table saw, a bit of work at the router table, a little drilling, sanding, a couple of coats of paste wax, and I was done.



 
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@PetersCreek , I still have to figure out how I want to set up a router table. I have a router that I purchased maybe 10 years ago. I tried using it freehand, you can guess how that turned out! Anyway, that'll be my next project, digging out the router and figuring out a table for it. Any suggestions?
 

PetersCreek

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@PetersCreek , I still have to figure out how I want to set up a router table. I have a router that I purchased maybe 10 years ago. I tried using it freehand, you can guess how that turned out! Anyway, that'll be my next project, digging out the router and figuring out a table for it. Any suggestions?
Much will depend on your budget, space, and how you plan to use it. If space and budget are tight, you could get started with something like the Kreg benchtop model.

If you want something full size, you can get kits and components from JessEm, Woodpecker, and others. Mine is built around Kreg’s full size top and base frame.





What kind of router do you have?
 
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I will have to dig it out to see specifically which router it is. Your set up looks sweet. Next time I'm off work (Friday) I'll check to see what it is. I'm on nights so it'll be late when I dig it out.
 
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Much will depend on your budget, space, and how you plan to use it. If space and budget are tight, you could get started with something like the Kreg benchtop model.

If you want something full size, you can get kits and components from JessEm, Woodpecker, and others. Mine is built around Kreg’s full size top and base frame.





What kind of router do you have?
It's a Dewalt, DW618. 2.25 hp, has a plunging base too.
Now it's time to start searching for tables that fit. Think I'll start by looking at the kreg table you mentioned.20190317_020612.jpg
 

PetersCreek

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It's a Dewalt, DW618. 2.25 hp, has a plunging base too.
Now it's time to start searching for tables that fit. Think I'll start by looking at the kreg table you mentioned.View attachment 133238
I have that router and like it. You shouldn't have any trouble finding a table that will take it, since it's based on the common Porter Cable 690 base hole pattern, IIRC. My Kreg table came with a blank un-drilled insert plate, with guidelines for various routers printed on the underside, to aid drilling.

While the Dewalt will certainly get you started, I think you'll eventually want to consider buying another router for dedicated service in the table. One reason is that you'll still need a handheld router for many tasks and swapping it out of the table is a time sap. Another reason is that making all of your adjustments under the table will grow tiresome. A popular option for those not ready to invest in a lift are Triton routers, especially their 3¼hp big boy. It's "dual mode" allows it to operate as a handheld plunge router or converted to router table use, the plunge feature becomes a built-in lift of sorts, with the ability to make precise height adjustments from above the table.
 
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